What Moms in Politics Really Want This Mother’s Day: Campaign-Funded Childcare

What Moms in Politics Really Want This Mother’s Day: Campaign-Funded Childcare. Posted by Katie Usalis by on May 09, 2022

Campaign-funded childcare addresses barriers that women face in politics. It levels the playing field so more women can run, and if combined with structural reform like ranked choice voting and legislative rule changes that modernize government work places, more women can win and lead. This could lead to important policies like universal affordable childcare and paid leave.

Read more

SCOTUS Wants Reproductive Rights Left Up to the States—Whose Representatives Are Still Overwhelmingly White and Male

SCOTUS Wants Reproductive Rights Left Up to the States—Whose Representatives Are Still Overwhelmingly White and Male. Posted by Cynthia Richie Terrell on May 09, 2022

RepresentWomen's founder and executive director, Cynthia Richie Terrell, explains why the Supreme Court leak on Roe vs. Wade is problematic. The underrepresentation of women in congress and in state legislatures makes the directive that state legislatures should hold the decision-making power a complete farce.

Read more

Everything’s bigger in Texas, including the negative impact of runoffs on women candidates

Everything’s bigger in Texas, including the negative impact of runoffs on women candidates. Posted by Katie Usalis by on April 15, 2022

This was originally published in The Fulcrum on 4/15/2022. Last month, Texas kicked off the midterm season with another batch of high-profile races going into a runoff — 23, to be exact. What’s so wrong with this? Two words: time and money. Both of which women candidates generally have less of. Ranked choice voting is a proven, powerful, and persevering solution.

Read more


Our Democracy Has Problems. Women Have Solutions.

Our Democracy Has Problems. Women Have Solutions.. Posted by Katie Usalis by on March 29, 2022

Originally published in Ms. Magazine on 2/22/2022. Cynthia Richie Terrell is the founder and executive director of RepresentWomen and a founding board member of the ReflectUS coalition of non-partisan women’s representation organizations. Jennifer Weiss-Wolf is the executive director of Ms. partnerships and strategy, and the women and democracy fellow at the Brennan Center. This piece features quotes from 20 women experts in democracy reform to answer two questions: 1) "What is your dream for democracy in the U.S., rooted in the cause for which you advocate?", and 2) "What is something—or a few things—you’re shocked aren’t already common practice in U.S. democracy in 2022?"

Read more

What the Oscars Academy Can Teach the U.S. About How to Run Political Elections

What the Oscars Academy Can Teach the U.S. About How to Run Political Elections. Posted by Katie Usalis by on March 28, 2022

Originally published in TheWrap, 3/23/2022. Katie Usalis of RepresentWomen, a nonpartisan organization that advocates for more women in office, talks about the use of Ranked Choice Voting by The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences to select Oscar nominees, to award Best Picture, and to elect its Board of Governors. Ranked choice voting is the best and easiest way to ensure representative outcomes that reflect majority support, and should also be used in US political elections.

Read more

Post-Soviet States: Learning from Women Amid a Battle for Democracy and Gender Equality

Post-Soviet States: Learning from Women Amid a Battle for Democracy and Gender Equality. Posted by Katie Usalis by , on March 28, 2022

Originally published in Ms. Magazine, 3/21/2022. Amid the war on Ukraine, Alisha Saxena and Kaycie Goral of RepresentWomen, a nonpartisan organization that advocates for more women in office, share research about representation in Post-Soviet States, and the intentional strategies in the region that have bolstered representation which are often overlooked or outright rejected in U.S. politics.

Read more

International Women’s Day: Reflections on representation

International Women’s Day: Reflections on representation. Posted by Katie Usalis by _usalis on March 28, 2022

Originally published in The Fulcrum, March 9th, 2022. Katie Usalis of RepresentWomen, a nonpartisan organization that advocates for more women in office, shares that thanks to the data collection work of the Inter-Parliamentary Union, we know there are continued global trends towards gender balance. Also exciting is that the Americas lead the way in the race towards gender balance, with 34 percent average regional representation! This is thanks to the intentional steps Latin American countries have taken to remove structural barriers to representation.

Read more

Coming to America: Exploring the underrepresentation of first-generation women in politics

Coming to America: Exploring the underrepresentation of first-generation women in politics. Posted by Katie Usalis by , on March 28, 2022

Originally published in The Fulcrum, Sept 13, 2021. Alisha Saxena and Kaycie Goral of RepresentWomen, a nonpartisan organization that advocates for more women in office, share that the American Immigration Council reported that roughly 44.7 million first-generation Americans lived in the United States earlier this year. Within this population, there were approximately 2 million more women than men. Despite making up about 14 percent of the U.S. population, first-gen Americans, specifically first-gen women, are hardly represented as a community within our political bodies.

Read more

'Bittersweet': Harris VP pick reminds some women the glass ceiling is still intact

'Bittersweet': Harris VP pick reminds some women the glass ceiling is still intact. Posted by Cynthia Richie Terrell on August 20, 2020

Cynthia Richie Terrell, the founder and executive director of RepresentWomen, a nonpartisan organization that advocates for more women in office, said that Biden's commitment early-on to picking a female running mate is an example of how men can wield their privilege to help change the underrepresentation of women in politics. "It's an important reminder that executives have a lot of power to accelerate progress to parity,” said Terrell. "It really begins to crack the egg of sexism, and all of a sudden people see that women can also be in positions of power."

Read more