A long road ahead: gender parity in elected office in the NMI

Marianas Variety . Posted by Nate Victor on June 19, 2017

As the Northern Mariana Islands do not have statehood, they did not receive a formal Gender Parity Score, but the GPI Report still tracks their progress toward parity. Unfortunately, their progress is only marginal. The Islands have never elected a female delegate to the U.S. House of Representatives or a female governor. Furthermore, just one of nine seats in the Northern Mariana Islands’ Senate and two of 20 seats in the territory’s House of Representatives are held by women.

Read more

Why Utah received an ‘F’ grade for its number of elected women

The Salt Lake Tribune. Posted by Nate Victor on June 15, 2017

A national group that seeks gender parity in politics gives Utah an "F" grade for how many women it elects. Representation2020 ranks Utah 46th among the 50 states for women's representation. It is one of 33 states that received a grade of "D" or "F" in the group's latest rankings, released this week. The group uses a "gender parity index" that rates women's electoral success on a scale of 0 (no women in major elected office) to 100 (women hold all such offices). It said its goal of gender parity is a score of 50 and an A grade. Utah received a score of 9.5, about half the national average score of 18.6.

Read more

USVI Makes Slow Progress on Women's Representation in Elected Office, U.S. Advocacy Group Finds

The Virgin Islands Consortium. Posted by Nate Victor on June 15, 2017

Representation2020, a nonprofit that advocates for institutional reforms to level the playing field for women candidates, enabling them to run, win, serve, and lead effectively, has released its latest analysis on the underrepresentation of women in elected office, quantified through the Gender Parity Index (GPI). The GPI rates women’s recent electoral success at the local, state, and national levels, and the 2017 report finds that women are underrepresented at all levels of government. According to the group, as of June 2017, the median Gender Parity Score is 18.6 out of 100, barely up from the 2015 score of 18.1. The GPI ranks New Hampshire first and Mississippi last in women’s political representation. Out of all 50 states, 33 have a Gender Parity Score below 25, giving them a grade of D or F.

Read more

Vermont Earns D Grade for Gender Parity in Elected Office

VT Digger. Posted by Nate Victor on June 15, 2017

Representation2020 has released its latest analysis on the underrepresentation of women in elected office, quantified through the Gender Parity Index (GPI). The GPI rates women’s recent electoral success at the local, state, and national levels on a scale of 0 (no women in major elected offices) to 100 (women hold all such offices). These scores also translate to a letter grade. The goal of gender parity is a score of 50 and an A grade, which indicates that women and men are equally likely to hold office. The 2017 GPI finds that women are underrepresented at all levels of government. As of June 2017, the median Gender Parity Score is 18.6, barely up from the 2015 score of 18.1. The GPI ranks New Hampshire first and Mississippi last in women’s political representation. Out of all 50 states, 33 have a Gender Parity Score below 25, giving them a grade of D or F.

Read more

How did Pa. score in national rating of women in elected office? Only Miss. is worse

Penn Live. Posted by Nate Victor on June 15, 2017

Representation2020 has released its latest analysis on the underrepresentation of women in elected office, quantified through the Gender Parity Index (GPI), and Pennsylvania was given the second-lowest grade on it. The GPI rates women's recent electoral success at the local, state, and national levels on a scale of 0 (no women in major elected offices) to 100 (women hold all such offices). These scores also translate to a letter grade, according to a press release that came out Wednesday. The goal of gender parity is a score of 50 and an A grade, which indicates that women and men are equally likely to hold office. The 2017 GPI finds that women are underrepresented at all levels of government.

Read more

Hoosier women underrepresented in political office

Indiana Daily Student. Posted by Nate Victor on June 14, 2017

Indiana has received a D grade for its representation of women in elected office, according to a recent report by Representation2020. In the report, Indiana received a score of 16.4 on the 2017 Gender Parity Index, compared with an average score of 18.6 for the U.S. as a whole. Indiana’s score dropped, falling from its 2015 score of 18.7. Indiana was ranked 32 in the country, trailing behind states like Arizona, California and Hawaii. States with the lowest scores in the country included Arkansas, Georgia and Kentucky. The GPI was calculated by tallying recent elections at local, state and national levels that placed women in office. Scores range from a zero for women holding no elected offices to 100 for women holding every elected office. The ideal score is a 50, which represents gender parity in elected office, according to the report.

Read more

Not Exactly 50-50

Coeur d'Alene Press. Posted by Nate Victor on June 13, 2017

A new study placing Idaho among the worst in the nation when it comes to women holding elected positions had leaders on both sides of the aisle doing something they rarely do — agreeing. “There is no gender test,” said Brent Regan, chair of the Kootenai County Republican Central Committee. “I would certainly welcome any good candidate for office.” Bev Moss, spoke on behalf of the Kootenai County Democrats. “When we’re running people, gender has not been a big consideration,” Moss said. “We would just like to get anybody elected — male or female.” Representation2020, which advocates for gender parity — a 50:50 ratio of men to women — in politics, created a grading system for states based on the recent electoral successes of female candidates at the local, state and national levels. Idaho received a “D” grade in the study, which places it at 45th in the nation.

Read more

When It Comes to Government Jobs Only One State Gets An "A" In Gender Parity

Mic. Posted by Nate Victor on May 12, 2017

Considering a woman has yet to break the nation's highest electoral glass ceiling — the presidency — it comes as no surprise that the country's other governing bodies aren't doing so great when it comes to gender equality either. A new report from Representation2020, an organization advocating for women's representation in politics, has found that just one state is doing well enough to merit an "A" rating in gender parity: New Hampshire. To determine New Hampshire's standing, researchers used a "gender parity index," a system that awards points to states based on how many women hold office in U.S. Congress, state executive positions, the state legislature and local government. New Hampshire was the first state to elect an all-female congressional delegation, with women currently occupying all four of its seats in the U.S. Senate and House.

Read more

Only One State in US is Suceeding at Gender Parity. Here's How to Change That

Jezebel.com. Posted by Nate Victor on May 09, 2017

A new report has found that nearly every state in the U.S. is failing when it comes to electing women to local, state and federal legislatures, and suggests our nation will continue to fall short of gender parity for generations to come unless lawmakers embrace major reforms to the voting system. The 2017 Gender Parity Index Report, recently released by Representation2020 (an initiative of nonpartisan electoral reform organization FairVote), offers the first comprehensive assessment of female representation at the local, state, and federal levels in the aftermath of the 2016 election. Women make up more than half the population and turn out to vote in significantly higher numbers than men. Yet, nearly a century after women earned the right to vote, women are notably less than halfway to equal representation in public office. The number of women in Congress and in state legislatures has stalled since the early 1990s. At that rate, women in Congress will not achieve gender parity until next century, and women in state legislatures will not have equal representation until after the year 3126.

Read more

Voting Rules Pose Barrier for Women

Voting Rules Pose Barrier for Women. Posted by Nate Victor on April 08, 2017

April marks a memorable centennial. On April 2, 1917, Jeannette Rankin, R-Montana, was sworn in as the first woman ever elected to Congress. Her election not only marked a milestone in the struggle for women’s political equality but provides a lesson about the importance of fair voting rules. Women today are a majority of voters, but progress toward political parity is virtually stagnant. Fewer than one in five House members are women, only four governors are women, and women’s share of state legislative seats has never reached even 25 percent. The United States now ranks 104th among nations for representation of women in national legislatures — a steep decline from 44th in 1995. At this rate, parity is at best centuries away. Why so little progress? There are several reasons, including cultural attitudes and bias. But a there’s an oft-overlooked barrier: our voting rules.

Read more