RepresentWomen's Vision

A thriving democracy is within our reach but new strategies are needed to level the playing field for women candidates across the racial, ideological, and geographic spectrum so that our nation's rich diversity is reflected in our elected bodies.

Electing more women to government will strengthen our democracy by making it more representative, reviving bipartisanship & collaboration, improving policy outcomes, encouraging a new style of leadership, and cultivating trust in our elected bodies.

 

Join us in turning public passion for gender parity into action and results

The Path to Gender Parity

The U.S. ranks behind 102 nations for women's representation, with women making up a quarter or less of every level of government. Yet progress is possible. With the momentum of a growing movement pushing us forward, we can win gender parity in our lifetimes - but only with new strategies that target the structural causes of women’s underrepresentation.

Women Running

Women Running

Recruitment Targets

Women Winning

Women Winning

Electoral Reform

Women Leading

Women Leading

Fairer Legislative Practices

Where Does Your State Rank?

Find out where your state ranks in the Gender Parity Index – the baseline to show progress toward parity in the states.

RepresentWomen Blog

#WomenToWatch on August 11: Beth Fukumoto

Posted on August 10, 2018

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A lot has changed for Beth Fukumoto in the past year. At the start of 2017, Beth Fukumoto was the top-ranking Republican in the Hawaii State House of Representatives. Fukumoto is of Japanese descent and was hailed in several publications as a leader of the changing face of the right. Tomorrow, she is running to become the Democratic nominee in Hawaii’s 1st congressional district. What hasn’t changed, though, is her passion for gender parity in government.

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Primary Recap: Tennessee

Posted on August 03, 2018

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Though hundreds of women are running and winning in 2018’s Congressional primaries, Republican women are strikingly underrepresented: just 17 percent of women nominees so far this cycle are Republicans. Prior to yesterday’s primary, Tennessee was widely considered to be an exception to this “rule”, with several experienced and well-known Republican women running for House, Senate, and Governor. The state has never elected a woman Governor or Senator. Just two women walked away yesterday with Republican nominations, though: current U.S. Representative Marsha Blackburn for Senate and Charlotte Bergmann for House District 9.

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Where Is the Data on Judicial Representation?

Posted on August 03, 2018

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In 2016, Tracey E. George and Albert H. Yoon, in conjunction with the American Constitution Society, published a study titled “The Gavel Gap” that found that 69.8% of state judges were men and 80.4% were white. In order to get this data, George, Yoon, and a team of research assistants spent over a year combing through federal court websites, press releases, newspapers, and other resources to create a database of over 10,000 state judges’ biographies. Despite this extensive effort, the finished database is still incomplete. They were unable to find data on the race of about 5% of judges. This database also excludes the nearly 20,000 judges who sit on local and special jurisdiction courts. Furthermore, the database also only reflects the makeup of the bench in 2014; many judges have inevitably retired or been voted out of office in the past four years.

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