Thank You

Thank you so much for your donation to RepresentWomen.

Your contribution will be used to support RepresentWomen's work to advance gender balance in elected office through systems reforms that enable more women to run, win, serve, and lead.

Follow our work on social media via Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Medium and keep an eye out for RepresentWomen data and analysis on traditional news media sources as well.

Please let me know if you have any questions or suggestions about our work.

Many thanks,

Cynthia

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Even after the "Year of the Woman," Republican women remain underrepresented

By NationBuilder Support on October 17, 2019

"It’s hard to not get excited about all of the young, diverse Republican women running in 2020. If the United States is ever going to achieve gender parity, it is necessary for more Republican women to get elected. However, there are obstacles standing in the way of those women becoming leaders in this country. Embracing recruitment targets and challenging PACs to set goals for the totals that they give to female candidates would alleviate the hurdles that these women face while running for office. Advancing these reforms is a key step in advancing women’s representation in government."

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Meet The Team: McKenna Donegan

By NationBuilder Support on October 16, 2019

"Addressing the lack of equal representation in government through changing recruiting practices and improving our electoral systems would ensure that future generations have women leaders to look up to. I hope the work I do this fall at RepresentWomen ensures that one day all women will have a seat at the table."

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Weekend Reading on Women's Representation October 11, 2019

By NationBuilder Support on October 11, 2019

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Dear friends,
The terrific team at the Center for American Women and Politics released their report Unfinished Business: Women Running in 2018 and Beyond this week that examines the gains women made in the midterm elections in 2018 and the barriers that still persist. Read the full report here but here is an excerpt from the Executive Summary:
Gender disparities in American politics were not upended in a single cycle, but the 2018 elec- tion marked sites of progress as well as persistent hurdles for women candidates. Evaluating the 2018 election in the context of both past and present offers key insights into the gendered terrain that candidates will navigate in 2020 and beyond.

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Weekend Reading on Women's Representation October 4, 2019

By NationBuilder Support on October 04, 2019

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Hello friends,
Another busy week of work and travel in and around the world of women's representation! Yet again, I do not have time to do justice to the many interesting threads that tell the story of this week's news of the progress and challenges that women face in politics in the US and around the world. But I will cobble together what I can glean from Google Alerts and headlines.
Last week, I featured Melinda Gates' article in the Harvard Business Review that discussed her support for a collection of strategies to advance women's representation and leadership across a number of sectors. This week Gates announced that she will give 1 billion dollars toward the work for women's equality which Time Magazine covered in this story - listen to a terrific interview with Melinda discussing her work for women's equality on the Harvard Business Review podcast. This unprecedented commitment to the work for women's equality will not only provide a wide range of organizations the support they need to build strategies for significant impact, it will also signal ( I hope) to other philanthropists that investing in strategies that advance and normalize women's equality is vital.

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Weekend Reading on Women's Representation September 27, 2019

By NationBuilder Support on September 27, 2019

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My dear friends,
 
Melinda Gates is using her considerable influence to encourage a deep conversation about the imperative for women's equality. This week she penned a long-form piece in the Harvard Business Review that makes the case for a collection of strategies to advance women's representation and leadership across sectors, here is her compelling conclusion:

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Meet the Team: Corinne Ahrens

By NationBuilder Support on September 24, 2019

"Working for RepresentWomen is important to me because their mission is concrete: increase the representation of women in politics while focusing on systems of reform; because no one can say, even though some may, that the underrepresentation of women in politics does not exist."

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Weekend Reading on Women's Representation September 20, 2019

By NationBuilder Support on September 20, 2019

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Dear friends,
I decided to take advantage of the gorgeous day here in NYC and walk through Central Park so this week's Weekend Reading update will be a photo essay crafted on a bench in the park!
This article by Jill Filipovic in Politico Magazine offers some very good questions about the merits and enforcement of gender quotas in Rwanda, here is the conclusion:

What can Rwanda’s experiment with gender quotas teach the United States? It’s clear that quotas, if enforced, increase women’s political power at least to some degree, and the symbolic value of women in power can have trickle-down effects. While Americans might bristle at a constitutional mandate, political parties could adopt voluntary quotas, pledging that a certain percentage of the candidates they run will be women. That would be easier for Democrats than Republicans: There are twice as many female Democratic senators as Republican, and nearly seven times as many Democratic congresswomen as Republican. Still, neither party is at parity, let alone even approaching Rwanda’s numbers.

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Weekend Reading on Women's Representation September 13, 2019

By NationBuilder Support on September 13, 2019

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Eleanor Roosevelt and Margaret Chase Smith on CBS News in 1956
My dear friends,
This week's democratic debate reminded me of one of my favorite largely-untold stories from American history. It was two women, Eleanor Roosevelt and Margaret Chase Smith, who appeared in very first televised presidential debate in the United States. Eleanor was of course an accomplished diplomat and high-profile democrat while Margaret was a long-serving republican member of Congress from Maine. I love everything about this story except that it isn't told enough!

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Meet the Team: Maura Reilly

By NationBuilder Support on September 09, 2019

“I myself have never been able to find out precisely what feminism is: I only know that people call me a feminist whenever I express sentiments that differentiate me from a doormat”  -Rebecca West, author

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