RepresentWomen's Vision

A thriving democracy is within our reach, and together, we can make it a reality.

We must level the playing field for women candidates of all backgrounds to run, win, and lead. 

Electing more women will strengthen our democracy by better representing its rich diversity, reviving bipartisanship, improving policy outcomes, encouraging a new style of leadership, and cultivating trust in our elected bodies.

 

Join us in turning public passion for gender parity into action and results

The Path to Gender Parity

The U.S. ranks behind 102 nations for women's representation, with women making up a quarter or less of every level of government. Yet progress is possible. With the momentum of a growing movement pushing us forward, we can win gender parity in our lifetimes - but only with new strategies that target the structural causes of women’s underrepresentation.

Women Running

Women Running

Recruitment Targets

Women Winning

Women Winning

Electoral Reform

Women Leading

Women Leading

Fairer Legislative Practices

Where Does Your State Rank?

Find out where your state ranks in the Gender Parity Index – the baseline to show progress toward parity in the states.

RepresentWomen Blog

#WomenToWatch on June 26

Posted on June 23, 2018

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Weekend Reading on Women's Representation June 22, 2018

Posted on June 22, 2018

As CBS News reports, Maine became the first state to use ranked choice voting for a statewide race this week and elected a woman. Janet Mills, as the democratic nominee. Secretary of State Matt Dunlap said the vote went off without a hitch and cost far less to administer than had been threatened during the campaign for the ranked choice voting ballot measure. Voters not only got to vote with a ranked ballot they also voted for it, again, by a comfortable margin. The campaign was marked by civility as displayed by this video!

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D.C. still has a long way to go to reach parity

Posted on June 22, 2018

On Tuesday, June 19th, D.C. held primary elections for mayor, city council, and non-voting delegate to the U.S. House. In the reliably Democratic District, the primary invariably determines the outcome of the general election. The most exciting race was not the actual election, but rather a ballot initiative extending D.C.’s $15 minimum wage to tipped workers, which passed by 55 percent approval. The primary elections for executive office and city council, in which all incumbents won their bid at re-election, shed light on gender and racial representation in the District’s government.

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