RepresentWomen's Vision

A thriving democracy is within our reach, and together, we can make it a reality.

We must level the playing field for women candidates of all backgrounds to run, win, and lead. 

Electing more women will strengthen our democracy by better representing its rich diversity, reviving bipartisanship, improving policy outcomes, encouraging a new style of leadership, and cultivating trust in our elected bodies.

 

Join us in turning public passion for gender parity into action and results

The Path to Gender Parity

The U.S. ranks behind 102 nations for women's representation, with women making up a quarter or less of every level of government. Yet progress is possible. With the momentum of a growing movement pushing us forward, we can win gender parity in our lifetimes - but only with new strategies that target the structural causes of women’s underrepresentation.

Women Running

Women Running

Recruitment Targets

Women Winning

Women Winning

Electoral Reform

Women Leading

Women Leading

Fairer Legislative Practices

Where Does Your State Rank?

Find out where your state ranks in the Gender Parity Index – the baseline to show progress toward parity in the states.

RepresentWomen Blog

Women's Representation & Ranked Choice Voting in four Bay Area Cities

Posted on June 08, 2018

Four cities in the Bay Area—San Francisco, Oakland, Berkeley, and San Leandro—have made the switch to an electoral system called Ranked Choice Voting (RCV). RCV is a voting system that allows voters to rank candidates as their first, second, third choice and so on. If no candidate has a majority when votes are counted, the candidate with the fewest number of votes is eliminated, and ballots that have those candidates marked as their first choice are counted towards the candidate they selected as their second choice. This process results in elections that are fairer and better represent voters’ preferences.

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Weekend Reading on Women's Representation June 8, 2018

Posted on June 08, 2018

Women now comprise two thirds of the cabinet of the newly-elected government in Spain according to this story in the The New York Times: Spain’s new prime minister on Wednesday unveiled a government that has more women than men and includes a foreign minister from Catalonia who has led the fight against the region’s independence movement. After meeting with King Felipe VI, Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez told journalists that his team was “a government for an equal society, open to the world but anchored in the European Union.”

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Weekend Reading on Women's Representation June 1, 2018

Posted on June 01, 2018

There were several articles this week that caught my eye including this one from Oklahoma Watch about the gender gap that still persists despite the increase in the number of women running: This year, there will be nearly four times as many women running for the same number of seats. And following a trend across the nation, women will be better represented on the ballot than in at least a decade – and likely ever. Female lawmakers say women bring a different perspective and tone to the often-contentious world of lawmaking. But Oklahoma’s gender disparity in the Legislature, which is among the most heavily male dominated in the country, is likely to continue despite movements such as the Oklahoma teacher walkout, the #MeToo movement and liberal opposition to President Donald Trump that have motivated more women across the country to enter politics. An Oklahoma Watch review of legislative candidate filings for the 2018 elections, social media pages and campaign websites shows that women make up 32 percent of this year’s field. That’s a significant increase over the past four election cycles, when female representation among legislative candidates ranged from 15 percent to 22 percent.

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