US Representation


Multi-Winner Districts and Women’s Representation: From New Zealand to the United States

Posted on Blog on September 29, 2017

New Zealand recently conducted its 2017 Parliamentary elections. With a mixed member electoral system in the House of Representatives, officials are elected from both single-winner electorates and party lists. In the recent election, 45% of the party list seats (multi-winner) were won by women, compared to only 35% of the general electorate seats (single-winner).


Monarchy or Democracy: Which Yields More Women's Leadership?

Posted on Blog on August 30, 2017

This past Saturday was Women’s Equality Day, which marked the anniversary of the Nineteenth Amendment. In the United States, women make up just 25% of state legislators, and even less at the federal level. And of course, we have never elected a woman as President. After 97 years of women’s suffrage, we should do better. But how? We looked to the rest of the world, and we found a solution: monarchy. You may be thinking of monarchy as an old-fashioned, outdated institution, and in many ways it is. But there is one way in which it strides ahead of democracy, and that is the number of women who have, as queens and empresses, led their countries. In these monarchies, throughout history and all over the world, there are countless examples of women’s political capabilities.


The Declaration of Sentiments: Then and Now

Posted on Blog on July 20, 2017

This week marks the 169th anniversary of a revolutionary event in the women's rights movement: the Seneca Falls Convention and the signing of the Declaration of Sentiments. It is an opportunity to reflect on how far our nation has come - or rather, how far we haven't.


Why You Don't Know Who Pauli Murray Is, and Why You Should

Posted on Blog by on July 03, 2017

I have to preface this article with a confession: up until this month, I didn’t know who she was either. The first time I ever heard Pauli Murray’s name spoken, it came from the mouth of Professor Brittney Cooper amidst an impassioned speech on racial politics. As an enthusiastic feminist and a connoisseur of empowered women’s narratives, I was disappointed that I had no idea who Murray was until that moment. But I understood why I didn’t know – and why you probably don’t.


Learning from Past Structural Reforms: 45th Anniversary of Title IX

Posted on Blog on June 23, 2017

This Friday, June 23, marks the 45th anniversary of Title IX. This landmark legislation, part of the United States Education Amendments of 1972, set out to ensure equal educational opportunities regardless of gender. This allowed for more women to attend college, earn scholarships, study STEM fields, and pursue advanced degrees. Title IX also became the basis for equality in athletics, which has helped increase the number of women who participate in high school sports by 900 percent. Today, Title IX provides protections against campus sexual harassment and assault – another example of its expansive reach. The passage of Title IX meant young women in school could finally participate in sports at the same rate as their male counterparts. Without structural intervention, it could have taken decades or longer for women to reach equal participation organically. Today, the underrepresentation of women in elected office requires the same type of structural reform. Telling women to run for office is not enough alone – just as telling women to play more sports was not enough before 1972. The only way to catalyze progress toward gender parity is through innovative rules changes.



Where does the US stand on gender quotas?

Posted on Blog by on July 08, 2016

More than half of the countries in the world today use some sort of an electoral quota system, whether it is for geographical, ethnic or gender diversification.