Skip navigation

Pages tagged "Resource:Report"

The Twin-Track Ecosystem in the 100 Largest Cities Report

Released: October 2022

In 2022, we released a follow-up to our report on women's representation in New York City, “Why Women Won in 2021.” In the report, we expand upon and re-evaluate our findings by researching 1) women’s representation in the next-largest cities in the U.S., and 2) which of the factors we observed in NYC are also present in these cities. The report concludes with a list of guiding takeaways,  aimed at changemakers interested in bringing the best practices and strategies that worked in New York City to other major cities. 

View the Report 


Why Women Won in 2021

Released: September 2022

In 2022, we released a report on the outcome of the 2021 elections in New York City. RepresentWomen partnered with The New Majority NYC (formerly 21 in '21) to study 1) the impact of term limits, matching funds, ranked choice voting, and candidate-focused strategies on women's representation, 2) how these factors worked together to bring NYC a majority-women council for the first time in history, and 3) what it will take to maintain and build upon this success story in the future. 

View the Report Executive Summary


2022 Gender Parity Index

To quantify progress towards gender parity in elected and appointed office, RepresentWomen developed the Gender Parity Index (GPI). Each year, a Gender Parity Score and grade is calculated for each of the 50 states and for the United States as a whole. The Gender Parity Score reflects women's recent electoral successes at the local, state, and national levels on a scale of 0 (if no women were elected to any offices) to 100 (if women held all elected offices). The key advantage of the GPI is that it enables comparisons to be made over time and among states. 

The 2022 Gender Parity Index

As of June 2022, there are 147 (28%) women in Congress: 24 in the Senate and 123 in the House. In 333 statewide elective executive offices, 101 (30%) are either led or co-led by women. Of 7,383 seats in state legislatures, women hold 2,295 (31%). At the local level, 367 (25%) of 1,465 cities are represented by women, and 80 (33%) of the five largest county governments in each state are either led or co-led by women.

And yet, overall progress towards parity is frustratingly incremental in the U.S. In 2022, the average parity score is 24.8. If we round up, this brings us to an average score of 25 out of 100, which means we are halfway to parity. In 2021, the average score was 24.6; two years ago, it was 23.8.

2022 Report Methodology Score Chart State-by-State Graphics


Exploring First-Generation Underrepresentation: How American Political Systems Impact Immigrant Women’s Political Engagement

A thriving democracy is within our reach, but our rules and systems must change to acknowledge the unique barriers that women with intersecting identities experience in the United States. Our nation’s rich diversity will be reflected in our government when all women have practical and fair opportunities to participate in American politics.

Our 2021 report, Exploring First-Generation Underrepresentation: How American Political Systems Impact Immigrant Women’s Political Engagement presents an introduction to the topic of first-generation representation in America, the barriers first-generation women face as candidates, and how well-designed structural reforms can help to make the political process more accessible for all. 

https://representwomen.app.box.com/embed/s/8myc4543ozuvcem0gikwhemwpomj74bb?sortColumn=date&view=list8005500

Download Interactive Copy Plain Text Format

For additional accessible formats (e.g. large print, braille), please contact us by email at [email protected]


Intersectional Disempowerment: Exploring Barriers for Disabled Female Political Candidates in the United States

A thriving democracy is within our reach, but our rules and systems must change to acknowledge the unique barriers that women with intersecting identities experience in the United States. Our nation’s rich diversity will be reflected in our government when all women have practical and fair opportunities to participate in American politics.

Our 2021 report, Intersectional Disempowerment: Exploring Barriers for Disabled Female Political Candidates in the United States presents an introduction to the topic of Disabled women's political participation in America, the barriers they face as candidates, and how well-designed structural reforms can help to make the political process more accessible for all. 

https://representwomen.app.box.com/embed/s/50eo6nxrmhh9tltvf8nkuvv9xqomt8nm?sortColumn=date&view=list8005500

PDF Download Interactive Copy Plain Text Format 

For additional accessible formats (e.g. large print, braille), please contact us by email at [email protected]


Women's Incarceration and its Impact on Political Participation and Representation

In the past few decades there has been heightened interest in and scholarship in incarceration and the incarcerated population in the United States. However, much of this research has surrounded male incarceration rates, often overlooking the growing number of incarcerated women. While male incarceration rates have steadily declined in the past decade with the help of public scrutiny, women have become the fastest-growing incarcerated population. Between 1980 and 2017, the population of incarcerated women has risen by 750% (The Sentencing Project, 2019). Along with the rapid growth, incarcerated and formerly incarcerated women face unique challenges in re-entering society and regaining voting rights all of which impact their political representation. To learn more about incarcerated women and political representation read our 2020 brief below. 

https://representwomen.app.box.com/embed/s/gyd1lk7k2hwvmxzsnoht7he14n80sluw?sortColumn=date&view=list8005500

Download 


In Ranked Choice Elections, Women WIN (2020)

Released: July 2020

Our 2020 ranked choice voting report, "In Ranked Choice Elections, Women WIN" provides a thorough review of ranked choice voting in the United States and how it is impacting women's representation in the cities that have implemented it. From 2010-2019, 19 cities and counties used ranked choice voting to elect their city officials, including 13 mayors and the city councilmembers in 14 jurisdictions. In that decade, women won 48% of all municipal elections.

Read Our 2020 Report


PACs and Donors: Agents of Change for Women's Representation

PACs should set funding targets for cis-women, transgender folk, and nonbinary candidates as well as increase those targets every election cycle until our elected bodies reflect the gender diversity of the population. With public pressure, equal funding for male, female, and genderqueer candidates may become a value proposition for PACs. The PAC environment is highly competitive and they are always looking for new ways to look different from other PACs to appeal to donors.

Read more about the breakdown of PAC giving in 2018 and our recommendations for PACs and donors in our 2020 PACs and Donors report.

Download 


Achieving Gender Parity - Systems Strategies Around the World

In many countries around the world, women are entering political office at higher rates than in the United States. As of January 2022, the U.S. was tied with Egypt and the Philippines in 72nd place for the number of women (120 of 433, or 28%) in the lower legislature, the U.S. House of Representatives. Twenty years ago, there were half as many women in the U.S. House, and the country ranked 59th for women's representation.

In 2020, RepresentWomen released a report analyzing the impact electoral rules and systems have on women's representation. We found that countries with proportional systems and gender quotas were more likely to have women present in their national legislature. Our report, "Achieving Gender Parity: Systems Strategies Around the World," also introduces new research on women heads of state and government, women in executive cabinets around the world, the use of ranked-choice voting internationally, and the role women's representation has on democratic rankings. 

Download


The Impact of Ranked Choice Voting on Representation

Released: August 2016

In 2016, RepresentWomen (then known as Representation 2020) studied the impact of single-winner ranked choice voting in the California Bay Area (Berkeley, Oakland, San Francisco, and San Leandro), a "hotbed of RCV implementation," where over 100 ranked choice elections had taken place between 2004 and 2014 to decide local leadership in 53 offices. The study found that more women (42%) and people of color (60%) ran in and won these elections since ranked choice voting was introduced. By the start of 2016, women held 59% and people of color held 60% of these offices.

Read Our 2016 Report