Research


Disabled Women

Posted on Our Research on August 11, 2021

A thriving democracy is within our reach, but our rules and systems must change to acknowledge the unique barriers that women with intersecting identities experience in the United States. Our nation’s rich diversity will be reflected in our government when all women have practical and fair opportunities to participate in American politics.

Our 2021 report, Intersectional Disempowerment: Exploring Barriers for Disabled Female Political Candidates in the United States presents an introduction to the topic of Disabled women's political participation in America, the barriers they face as candidates, and how well-designed structural reforms can help to make the political process more accessible for all. 

https://representwomen.app.box.com/embed/s/50eo6nxrmhh9tltvf8nkuvv9xqomt8nm?sortColumn=date&view=list8005500

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Women & The President's Cabinet

Posted on Our Research on November 12, 2020

Women & The Cabinet

After the President and Vice President, members of the President's Cabinet constitute some of the most powerful leaders in the United States. But since Cabinet positions are appointed and not elected, it is up to the President to ensure that their Cabinet is diverse and representative. While 15 countries currently meet or exceed gender parity on their Executive Cabinets, the United States is still far from achieving this goal. Appointing a gender-balanced cabinet is one of the fastest ways that the United States can achieve greater gender-based representation. 

https://fairvote.app.box.com/embed/s/raecve5953rz2tvkh02swsmge4je5qoz?sortColumn=date&view=list8005500

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To learn more about the history of gender diversity in Presidential Cabinets, take a look through our timeline below.

https://cdn.knightlab.com/libs/timeline3/latest/embed/index.html?source=1tya8DnJog9PGWizXUCZ2T4Ed6MgEmiHomnt6Dl0kwt8&font=Default&lang=en&initial_zoom=2&height=650100%6500


Meet the Team: Courtney Lamendola

Posted on Blog on October 01, 2018

When I signed up for “Theories of International Relations” last year, I never expected to learn as much about feminism as I did. And yet, while sitting in my first class, I was introduced to the works of J. Ann Tickner – a feminist IR theorist who argues that omitting women from political theory leads to women being omitted from political practice. Through that class, I learned that there are structural causes for the underrepresentation of women in politics, and that this is evident not only in the makeup of our leaders, but also in how our future leaders are being taught.


Understanding New Research on Gender and Corruption in Government

Posted on Blog by , , on June 21, 2018

An April 2018 study titled “Women and corruption: What positions must they hold to make a difference?” found that corruption is lower in countries with more women in office at both the national and local level. The authors suggest that this is because women legislators often champion policies that address poverty, education, and healthcare at a greater rate than men, and have been found to be “more concerned about whether subsidies were provided to the targeted group without corruption.”


An Analysis of Merit Selection on State Courts

Posted on Blog on January 10, 2018

There are six different ways in which judges get seats on state courts: merit selection, gubernatorial appointment, partisan election, nonpartisan election, legislative appointment, and court appointment.


The Status of Women's Representation on the NYC Council

Posted on Blog on October 25, 2017

Women make up a majority of the population in New York City. In 2001,18 women served on the New York City Council but in 2017 only 13 women serve on the 51-seat City Council, and that number is projected to shrink in 2018. Out of the 13 current city councilwomen, four were ineligible to run again due to term limits, while one decided not to run for re-election. All five of these women are of color. At best, 12 women will be serving in the 2018 New York City Council. There were no primary challengers for the single Republican incumbent up for re-election. Though 113 Democrats ran for contested seats, only 38 were women. A third of Democratic primaries didn’t even have a woman on the ballot. No women are running to replace Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito, meaning that New York City will be bereft of a female speaker for the first time since 2005.


Multi-Winner Districts and Women’s Representation: From New Zealand to the United States

Posted on Blog on September 29, 2017

New Zealand recently conducted its 2017 Parliamentary elections. With a mixed member electoral system in the House of Representatives, officials are elected from both single-winner electorates and party lists. In the recent election, 45% of the party list seats (multi-winner) were won by women, compared to only 35% of the general electorate seats (single-winner).


Monarchy or Democracy: Which Yields More Women's Leadership?

Posted on Blog on August 30, 2017

This past Saturday was Women’s Equality Day, which marked the anniversary of the Nineteenth Amendment. In the United States, women make up just 25% of state legislators, and even less at the federal level. And of course, we have never elected a woman as President. After 97 years of women’s suffrage, we should do better. But how? We looked to the rest of the world, and we found a solution: monarchy. You may be thinking of monarchy as an old-fashioned, outdated institution, and in many ways it is. But there is one way in which it strides ahead of democracy, and that is the number of women who have, as queens and empresses, led their countries. In these monarchies, throughout history and all over the world, there are countless examples of women’s political capabilities.