Republican Women


Even after the "Year of the Woman," Republican women remain underrepresented

Posted on Blog by on October 17, 2019

"It’s hard to not get excited about all of the young, diverse Republican women running in 2020. If the United States is ever going to achieve gender parity, it is necessary for more Republican women to get elected. However, there are obstacles standing in the way of those women becoming leaders in this country. Embracing recruitment targets and challenging PACs to set goals for the totals that they give to female candidates would alleviate the hurdles that these women face while running for office. Advancing these reforms is a key step in advancing women’s representation in government."


Dr. Joan Perry was hope for Republican women. What happened?

Posted on Blog by on July 16, 2019

Dr. Joan Perry and Rep. Greg Murphy have a lot in common. They were both candidates in the primary run-off for North Carolina’s third congressional district. They’re both doctors. They’re both Republicans. They’re both against abortion. But they also have one key difference — Murphy is advancing to the general election, and Perry isn’t. On July 9, in a race to fill a seat in Congress left by Walter Jones when he died, Murphy took home 60 percent of the vote, while Perry garnered only 40.  This outcome highlights the Republican Party’s consistent struggle to elect women. While the results of the 2018 midterm election broke records for women’s representation, most of the victories were on the Democrats’ side. Democrats sent 89 women to the House of Representatives, while the number of Republican women in the House fell from 23 to 13.  But why aren’t Republican women winning?