Representation




What we can learn from women leaders in Indonesia

Posted on Blog by on July 25, 2019

The RepresentWomen team met with a group of politically engaged women from Indonesia this week. They were visiting the United States as part of the U.S. Department of State’s International Visitor Leadership Program, which connects current and aspiring politicians abroad with their American counterparts. We were happy to sit down with these women to discuss women’s political participation and representation in our respective countries.


Election Eve 2018 Update: Weekend Reading on Women's Representation November 5, 2018

Posted on Blog on November 05, 2018

Before the final frenzy of GOTV and the inevitable coverage of close wins and losses and the discussion of what it all means for our democracy, I wanted to take a moment to thank all the terrific candidates and the groups and individuals who have helped them make this year a milestone for women candidates. Thank you. Thanks to the candidates, thanks to all of you who have supported the candidates, thanks to the many organizations who have identified & guided the candidates, thanks to all the donors who have helped to make their campaigns viable, and thanks to all those who have supported their wives/mothers/daughters/sisters as they run for office.


Starting from the Bottom is Why We're Here: Representation in Political Theory

Posted on Blog by on July 21, 2017

Over the past year we’ve been looking at powerful women, and the lack thereof, in executive, legislative, judicial, civil service, and security positions. We want to provide data to help contextualize questions of barriers preventing women from climbing up the public service ladder, and eventually provide a tool for overcoming these barriers - from legislation to grassroots organizing. But these questions got me thinking, not necessarily about the pathways and obstacles that individual women face in their journeys to public leadership, but about the pathway that our society is currently on, and how unchanged that pathway has remained since Athens in the fifth century B.C. It is called “the canon” – specifically, the political theory canon. This canon, and the men that have created it, defined not only western political thinking, but western political structures. These works are considered timeless– which means that not only are their grandiose ideas of liberty and democracy carried into the 21st century, but their bigotry and biases come along too.