Ranked Choice Voting


Want a democracy that looks like America? Switch to ranked elections!

Posted on News Coverage by on August 10, 2020

In the previous nine years, there have been 156 local ranked choice elections among three or more candidates — and women have won 48 percent of them. Of those winners, 38 percent were women of color. At the start of this year, women were half of all mayors and 49 percent of all city council members elected by RCV. As more cities, and now states, begin adopting and implementing ranked-choice voting, it will be worth noting if these positive outcomes continue to grow.



New Research Shows Ranked Choice Voting Helps Women Win

Posted on News Coverage on August 05, 2020

Nearly 100 years after a large number of American women won the right to vote, progress for women in politics in the United States remains slow. Women have made important gains, but remain dramatically underrepresented in proportion to our share of the population — especially women of color and Republican women. Men disproportionately dominate Congress, state legislatures, city councils, and other elective offices.


Weekend Reading on Women's Representation June 12, 2020

Posted on Blog on June 12, 2020

There were a number of significant milestones related to women's equality and representation this week including the anniversary of the day that the Equal Pay Act was signed into law in 1963 and the birthdays of many remarkable women including Kathy Spillar, the executive editor of Ms Magazine, former first ladies Martha Washington & Barbara Bush, Ms Foundation CEO Teresa Younger, Representative Eleanor Holmes Norton, and Jeannette Rankin who was the 1st woman elected to Congress, in 1916. Like most suffragists, Rankin was a republican and was elected from a multi-seat district in Montana which was then a heavily democratic state. Alarmed by her win, the democrats switched to single winner districts (which disadvantage women candidates) during her term, making it all but impossible for her to win re-election. She did run again and served one more term in the 1940s: she was the only member of Congress to vote against entry into both World Wars. Rankin was a suffragist and an avid supporter of a national popular vote for president and preferential voting - aka Ranked Choice Voting!


Weekend Reading on Women's Representation May 1, 2020

Posted on Blog on May 01, 2020

As the general election looms ever closer, concern about the voting process is intensifying. There was a great piece in The Fulcrum this week by LeeAnne Grapes about combining mailed ballots with ranked choice voting to ensure a healthy & safe voting process: Of course, no one could have foreseen a pandemic upending life as we know it. But as the threat of coronavirus became increasingly pressing, the state's Democratic leadership responded by cancelling the in-person caucuses and instead mailing every registered Democrat a ballot that could be dropped off or mailed back.


Weekend Reading on Women's Representation April 24, 2020

Posted on Blog on April 24, 2020

There was a very interesting piece by Michelle Quist in The Salt Lake Tribune about the under-representation of women in state and local government in Utah and the use of Ranked Choice Voting in several jurisdictions and for GOP state party elections. Utah is a fascinating case study because the legislature adopted the local option bill almost unanimously, the republican party has been central to its effective implementation, and a number of women have been elected with RCV to local office with the catchy slogan faster, better, cheaper to describe ranked choice voting:


Weekend Reading on Women's Representation April 17, 2020

Posted on Blog on April 17, 2020

Many of you have probably seen the widely-circulated piece by Avivah Wittenberg-Cox in Forbes about the impressive role that women leaders have been playing in reducing the impact of the coronavirus in their respective countries. These countries all have some form of proportional representation system to elect their parliaments which, in tandem with intentional recruitment strategies, leads to more women getting elected and women's power becoming normalized. While the United States ranks 81st worldwide for women's representation, Germany ranks 49th, New Zealand ranks 20th, Iceland ranks 31st, Finland ranks 11th, Norway ranks 17th, and Denmark ranks 25th. Research confirms that voting systems have a clear impact on norms around women's leadership and representation, if you'd like to learn more click here. And read a snippet of the piece by Avivah Wittenberg-Cox below: