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Strides Towards Gender Parity in Mexico

Posted on Blog by on July 06, 2018

In both the United States and Mexico, 2018 has been called “the year of the woman,” an inspiring phrase based on the surges of female political activism across the globe. Despite using the same battle cry, the electoral landscapes for women in the two countries are drastically different: according to the Inter-Parliamentary Union’s measurement of women’s representation in parliament, the US ranks 102rd internationally, while Mexico ranks a striking 9th. Such an incredible gap cannot be simply explained by only one factor; however, Mexico’s mandatory gender quotas for political parties, along with a combination of proportional and winner-take-all districts, are indelibly crucial components, offering insightful lessons for visibly urgent change in the US. Mexico has a history of legal support for parity in politics, but their most comprehensive and successive initiative has been the 2014 law requiring parties to ensure that 50% of candidates are female. Now, four years later, 42.5% of the lower house of Congress is female, an astounding number on par with Scandinavian countries. For contrast, the percentage of women in the US House of Representatives is not even 20%.


#WomenToWatch on July 17

Posted on Blog by on July 06, 2018

#WomenToWatch is a series by RepresentWomen that documents rising women leaders and their stories. Alabama holds primary runoff elections on July 17th, and Republicans will vote for their Lieutenant Governor nominee alongside a few House races. Women are few and far between in Alabama politics — Alabama receives a D in this year’s Gender Parity Index — but not so in this year’s race for governor and lieutenant governor. Kay Ivey, the Republican gubernatorial incumbent, won her primary handily and is a heavy favorite to win reelection in the deep-red state. The upcoming Republican primary runoff will decide if Twinkle Cavanaugh, the President of the Public Service Commission of Alabama and former chairwoman for the Alabama Republican Party, will appear with Ivey on the November ballot.


Weekend Reading on Women's Representation June 29, 2018

Posted on Blog on June 29, 2018

Research shows women govern differently than men in ways that change policy and even social attitudes. When more women get into politics, a lot more changes than you might think. Academics have found this over and over again: Women legislators are more likely to introduce legislation that specifically benefits women. They’re better at bringing funding back to their home districts. They get more done. A woman legislator, on average, passed twice as many bills as a male legislator in one recent session of Congress. But the research that stands out most shows that having more women in elected office fundamentally changes the way that society perceives women — and the way that young women think about themselves.



June 26 Primaries: Slow Progress for Women Candidates

Posted on Blog by on June 27, 2018

This Tuesday saw primaries in five states -- New York, Maryland, Colorado, Utah, and Oklahoma** -- and runoff elections in Mississippi and South Carolina. Dozens of women ran for their party’s nomination to the U.S. House of Representatives and U.S. Senate, as well as for statewide elected offices like Lieutenant Governor and Secretary of State. Currently, women are drastically underrepresented in Congress (20 percent) and in statewide elected office (23 percent).


#WomenToWatch on June 26

Posted on Blog by , , on June 23, 2018

Weekend Reading on Women's Representation June 22, 2018

Posted on Blog on June 22, 2018

As CBS News reports, Maine became the first state to use ranked choice voting for a statewide race this week and elected a woman. Janet Mills, as the democratic nominee. Secretary of State Matt Dunlap said the vote went off without a hitch and cost far less to administer than had been threatened during the campaign for the ranked choice voting ballot measure. Voters not only got to vote with a ranked ballot they also voted for it, again, by a comfortable margin. The campaign was marked by civility as displayed by this video!


D.C. still has a long way to go to reach parity

Posted on Blog on June 22, 2018

On Tuesday, June 19th, D.C. held primary elections for mayor, city council, and non-voting delegate to the U.S. House. In the reliably Democratic District, the primary invariably determines the outcome of the general election. The most exciting race was not the actual election, but rather a ballot initiative extending D.C.’s $15 minimum wage to tipped workers, which passed by 55 percent approval. The primary elections for executive office and city council, in which all incumbents won their bid at re-election, shed light on gender and racial representation in the District’s government.


Understanding New Research on Gender and Corruption in Government

Posted on Blog by , , on June 21, 2018

An April 2018 study titled “Women and corruption: What positions must they hold to make a difference?” found that corruption is lower in countries with more women in office at both the national and local level. The authors suggest that this is because women legislators often champion policies that address poverty, education, and healthcare at a greater rate than men, and have been found to be “more concerned about whether subsidies were provided to the targeted group without corruption.”


Women are Underrepresented on the Courts

Posted on Blog by on June 20, 2018

While there has been much media coverage on gender disparity in the legislative branch, there is little attention being paid to the lack of representation of women and people of color in the judicial branch. Less than one-third of state judges are women, even while women make up more than one-half of the U.S. population. People of color make up about 40% of the population, but account for less than 20 percent of state judges. At the federal level, only 36 percent of United States trial court judges are women and only 10.5 percent of U.S. federal judges are women of color.


Join us in turning public passion for gender parity into action and results