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Women's representation is the heart of the democracy reform movement

Posted on News Coverage on March 02, 2020

Abigail Adams wrote to her husband at the Continental Congress in 1776, warning John: "If particular care and attention is not paid to the ladies, we are determined to foment a rebellion, and will not hold ourselves bound by any laws in which we have no voice or representation." That famous quote is a timely reminder that women have long been at the forefront of democracy reform to demand that our voices be heard. As our country celebrates a century of the 19th Amendment and the "universal" suffrage that came with its ratification, we also must reflect on the slow and minimal progress we've made in the past century.


Weekend Reading on Women's Representation February 28, 2020

Posted on Blog on February 28, 2020

In addition to the foundation’s 20th anniversary, this year marks another milestone I’ve been thinking about a lot lately: the 25th anniversary of the Beijing World Conference on Women. (If that name doesn’t ring a bell, you may know it as the event where Hillary Clinton famously declared that “Human rights are women's rights, and women’s rights are human rights.”) I remember reading about the conference and feeling that the world had planted an important stake in the ground for women. But it took years before I recognized how gender equality would fit into my own work.


Weekend Reading on Women's Representation February 21, 2020

Posted on Blog on February 21, 2020

This year marks the centennial of the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution. A hundred years after suffragists fought for and won the right to vote, women voters—empowered by the feminist, civil rights and LGBTQ movements—will likely determine the outcome of the high-stakes elections of 2020. Indeed, the power of women voters and feminist candidates to secure women’s rights is right now on display in Virginia, where the State House and Senate have just voted to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment, making theirs the 38th and final state needed to add women to the Constitution.


Weekend Reading on Women's Representation February 14, 2020

Posted on Blog on February 14, 2020

In recent years we have seen a rise of female representation in governments throughout the world owing in part to certain measures that have been taken allowing for more women in politics. One such measure, albeit a controversial one which to this day stirs quite a debate ranging from it defying the principle of equal opportunity to being outright undemocratic, is the gender-based quota imposed by governments to ensure a substantial female legislative representation. Governments in the MENA region have also taken this issue in stride, a great example of this is seen in the UAE’s Federal National Council (FNC), where the female participation quota has been increased to fifty per cent in an attempt by the government to cement the legislative and parliamentary role of women in the nation's development. Topping this growing list of governments with the greatest gender parity is Rwanda where women make up 61.3% of the lower house


Weekend Reading on Women's Representation February 7, 2020

Posted on Blog on February 07, 2020

While it has been a very busy week politically in Iowa and in Washington, DC, it is the eve of another increasingly political event - the Oscars - this coming Sunday evening. RepresentWomen's terrific research fellow Maura Reilly wrote It’s Time for the OscHers: When Will the Academy Honor Female-Driven Storytelling? that ran in the celebrity online news source The Wrap this week. Be sure to cast your ranked vote for best woman director in our online poll - we will release the results Sunday night: Support for movies, television and books that exemplify women and girls’ perspectives is not just about being recognized at award shows. The Geena Davis Institute has found the portrayal of women and girls in media directly impacts how young girls view their own abilities and options. “If they can see it, they can be it,” Davis has said, noting that the first step to gaining gender equality and equal opportunity is allowing young girls to imagine any role, job and life that they want for themselves. One of the biggest barriers for women reaching the highest levels of elected office is the perception of female leaders. The first step has to be normalizing the idea of female leaders across all fields — whether elected, appointed or fictional.


Weekend Reading on Women's Representation January 31, 2020

Posted on Blog on January 31, 2020

Last night I had the real pleasure of participating in the launch for a new book on strategies to modernize our voting and election systems called When Women Vote: When Women Vote highlights the challenges Americans, particularly women, face when trying to vote in the current voting system, and the amazing things that happen with reform. We make the case for further voting reform and for removing bias in the voting process by sharing stories and experiences of women voters and leaders throughout the United States.


Weekend Reading on Women's Representation January 24, 2020

Posted on Blog on January 24, 2020

Bridgette Bruno, Research and Communications Manager for the Barbara Lee Family Foundation, wanted to make sure that readers know about the webinar "Ready, Willing, & Electable: Women Running for Executive Office" that they are hosting on their new research which asks about hypothetical Asian American, Black, Latina, lesbian and white women candidates of the two major political parties to comprehensively examine what it takes for a woman to prove to voters she is ready to serve in executive office.


Meet the Team: Katie Murnane

Posted on Blog on January 23, 2020

“If you want to lift up humanity, empower women. It is the most comprehensive, pervasive, high-leverage investment you can make in human beings.” Melinda Gates, Moment of Lift


Meet the Team: Faith Campbell

Posted on Blog on January 23, 2020

Hello! My name is Faith, and I just started as a research intern here at RepresentWomen. I’m in Washington for the Semester, but this is not my first time here by a long shot. My (twin) sister moved to the area a few years ago, and I have since repeatedly come to visit. I am a Political Science with a Pre-Law track and a minor in Religion at Marietta College, currently attend AU’s Washington Semester Program with a concentration in Foreign Policy. During my time so far at Marietta College I have been involved with multiple organizations in varying capacities. My favorite being my role as vice-president of the LGBTQIA+ Activism Club.


Meet the Team: Jordan

Posted on Blog on January 22, 2020

As a debater in high school, I was told to "cool it" or to "calm down" because I  was "too aggressive" at least once a tournament. It took me way too long to decipher the coded language saying that I wasn't allowed to raise my voice or make impassioned arguments because I was a woman in a male-dominated sport. No matter what I did to try to counteract it--causing me to question my likeability and personality--I would be docked points. So, in my junior year, I decided to lean into it. I became the very best pant-suit-and-stiletto-wearing-cheerleader-debater that my school had seen. It was unapologetically me.