Quick News


Meet the Team: Evelien van Gelderen

Posted on Blog by on June 15, 2018

Meet the Team: Katie Pruitt

Posted on Blog on June 13, 2018

Women's Representation & Ranked Choice Voting in four Bay Area Cities

Posted on Blog on June 08, 2018

Four cities in the Bay Area—San Francisco, Oakland, Berkeley, and San Leandro—have made the switch to an electoral system called Ranked Choice Voting (RCV). RCV is a voting system that allows voters to rank candidates as their first, second, third choice and so on. If no candidate has a majority when votes are counted, the candidate with the fewest number of votes is eliminated, and ballots that have those candidates marked as their first choice are counted towards the candidate they selected as their second choice. This process results in elections that are fairer and better represent voters’ preferences.


Weekend Reading on Women's Representation June 8, 2018

Posted on Blog on June 08, 2018

Women now comprise two thirds of the cabinet of the newly-elected government in Spain according to this story in the The New York Times: Spain’s new prime minister on Wednesday unveiled a government that has more women than men and includes a foreign minister from Catalonia who has led the fight against the region’s independence movement. After meeting with King Felipe VI, Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez told journalists that his team was “a government for an equal society, open to the world but anchored in the European Union.”


Meet the Team: Barbara Turnbull

Posted on Blog by on June 08, 2018

Weekend Reading on Women's Representation June 1, 2018

Posted on Blog on June 01, 2018

There were several articles this week that caught my eye including this one from Oklahoma Watch about the gender gap that still persists despite the increase in the number of women running: This year, there will be nearly four times as many women running for the same number of seats. And following a trend across the nation, women will be better represented on the ballot than in at least a decade – and likely ever. Female lawmakers say women bring a different perspective and tone to the often-contentious world of lawmaking. But Oklahoma’s gender disparity in the Legislature, which is among the most heavily male dominated in the country, is likely to continue despite movements such as the Oklahoma teacher walkout, the #MeToo movement and liberal opposition to President Donald Trump that have motivated more women across the country to enter politics. An Oklahoma Watch review of legislative candidate filings for the 2018 elections, social media pages and campaign websites shows that women make up 32 percent of this year’s field. That’s a significant increase over the past four election cycles, when female representation among legislative candidates ranged from 15 percent to 22 percent.



Weekend Reading on Women's Representation May 25, 2018

Posted on Blog on May 25, 2018

Four states held primaries/runoffs this week: Texas, Georgia, Kentucky, and Arkansas. I worked hard in 1989 to elect Douglas Wilder to be the first male Black governor elected in the United States so it's particularly exciting to report that Stacey Abrams won the primary in Georgia and now moves forward to the general election. A win in November would make Abrams the first female Black governor in the US. The New York Times reported on her win and Kelly Dittmar from the Center for American Women & Politics provides yet another terrific summary of election outcomes:


Weekend Reading on Women's Representation May 18, 2018

Posted on Blog on May 18, 2018

Another round of primaries this week resulted in wins for women in crowded primaries at the state and federal level - as the New York Times reports: Just as the women’s marches and #MeToo helped define 2017, the surging numbers of female candidates have defined the midterm races now underway. Yet for all that, the November elections may not produce a similar surge in the number of women in Congress. More than half the female candidates for House and Senate seats are challenging incumbents, who historically almost always win; there were far more wide-open races in 1992’s so-called Year of the Woman, which doubled the number of women in Congress. A large percentage of the women now running for open seats are in districts that favor the other party. And many female candidates are clustered in the same districts, meaning many will be eliminated in this spring and summer’s primaries. Last Tuesday’s primary elections in Ohio, West Virginia, Indiana and North Carolina help illustrate the steep path. Two women ran for Senate, both were long shots, and both lost. In House races, 27 women won — more than half. But 16 will challenge incumbents in November, 15 of them in districts firmly favoring their opponents...


Weekend Reading on Women's Representation May 11, 2018

Posted on Blog on May 11, 2018

I'll start this week with some truly great news! The Washington Post was among a number of news outlets that covered the FEC's decision to allow candidates to pay for childcare from money raised for their campaign. RepresentWomen has been talking about this and other rules changes that level the playing field for women in politics so it's great to see this precedent being set. Post columnist Julie Zauzner writes: Candidates for office can use campaign funds to pay for child care in certain cases, the Federal Election Commission ruled on Thursday in a case heralded by some activists as a victory for working women. First-time congressional candidate Liuba Grechen Shirley, a Long Island Democrat, had petitioned the FEC for permission to pay her babysitter out of money donated to her campaign. Grechen Shirley, who previously cared for her children full time, argued that she needed the sitter only for her bid for office and that the payment therefore constituted a campaign expense.