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Weekend Reading on Women's Representation September 21, 2018

Posted on Blog on September 21, 2018

There was a very interesting story in ISS Today about women's representation in Somalia which has been increasing since the introduction and reintroduction of quotas - while compliance and implementation have been a challenge, women are 'claiming their place in Somalia politics": Women’s participation in Somali politics has traditionally been low, and a controversial topic in the country. Somali society typically ascribes to more conservative notions of a woman’s role in family and community life, rarely envisioning a position of political leadership in a male-dominated system. This has been changing, but there’s a long road ahead.


Weekend Reading on Women's Representation September 14, 2018

Posted on Blog on September 14, 2018

Just in case you missed this reminder in last week's missive, projected wins for women in House races this fall will likely put the US somewhere in the 70s for women's representation among all nations - in 1998, the US ranked 60th...let's be sure to appreciate and digest the impressive work being done in other countries to elect more women to office - faster.


Weekend Reading on Women's Representation September 7, 2018

Posted on Blog on September 07, 2018

The primaries are nearly over save for remaining contests in New Hampshire (September 11), Rhode Island (September 12), & New York (September 13) according to the National Conference of State Legislatures while "Louisiana’s Nov. 6, 2018, election is an all-comers primary, where candidates of all parties are listed on one ballot together. If no candidate for a race receives a majority of the votes, the winner will be determined in a runoff on December 8." As a reminder, the runoff elections that are triggered in Louisiana & elsewhere, if no candidate wins a majority, are costly and fewer voters participate in them making ranked choice voting a sensible solution.


Meet the Team: Baktybek Kainazarov

Posted on Blog on August 29, 2018

Coming from a patriarchal society in Central Asia, it is a great challenge to advocate for women’s political participation and gender advancement. When I meet colleagues from governmental institutions and even from civil society organizations, they ask two questions: “Why does the political participation of women matter for our country and is it difficult to advocate for gender advancement while being male?” My simple answer is that I think about the future of my daughter and little sisters who are potentially vulnerable to issues such as underage marriage, bride kidnapping, gender based violence, and girls education.


RepresentWomen and Nepali Elected Officials Discuss the Future of Women's Political Representation

Posted on Blog on August 24, 2018

From the hills of the Himalayas to our nation’s capital, the fight for female representation in politics shares many of the same successes and setbacks. Commonalities emerged during a robust and rewarding discussion between RepresentWomen staffers and eight Nepali women leaders. The women, a mix of federal, state and local government officials, visited FairVote’s Takoma Park office on Tuesday as part of an visit coordinated by the U.S. Department of State’s International Visitor Leadership Program and hosted by FHI 360. The meeting also gave participants an opportunity to better understand how their respective country’s electoral and gender parity policies differed.


#Women to Watch on September 4th

Posted on Blog by on August 17, 2018

#WomenToWatch is a series by RepresentWomen that documents rising women leaders and their stories. Ayanna Pressley’s campaign message is simple: “Change Can't Wait." Pressley, a 44-year old African American woman, was the first black female Boston City Council member. She is running in the Massachusetts Democratic primaries on September 4th to represent the state’s 7th Congressional District. She will be up against incumbent Representative Mike Capuano, who has held the seat for the past 20 years.


#WomenToWatch on August 11

Posted on Blog by on August 10, 2018

A lot has changed for Beth Fukumoto in the past year. At the start of 2017, Beth Fukumoto was the top-ranking Republican in the Hawaii State House of Representatives. Fukumoto is of Japanese descent and was hailed in several publications as a leader of the changing face of the right. Tomorrow, she is running to become the Democratic nominee in Hawaii’s 1st congressional district. What hasn’t changed, though, is her passion for gender parity in government.


Primary Recap: Tennessee

Posted on Blog by on August 03, 2018

Though hundreds of women are running and winning in 2018’s Congressional primaries, Republican women are strikingly underrepresented: just 17 percent of women nominees so far this cycle are Republicans. Prior to yesterday’s primary, Tennessee was widely considered to be an exception to this “rule”, with several experienced and well-known Republican women running for House, Senate, and Governor. The state has never elected a woman Governor or Senator. Just two women walked away yesterday with Republican nominations, though: current U.S. Representative Marsha Blackburn for Senate and Charlotte Bergmann for House District 9.


Where Is the Data on Judicial Representation?

Posted on Blog by on August 03, 2018

In 2016, Tracey E. George and Albert H. Yoon, in conjunction with the American Constitution Society, published a study titled “The Gavel Gap” that found that 69.8% of state judges were men and 80.4% were white. In order to get this data, George, Yoon, and a team of research assistants spent over a year combing through federal court websites, press releases, newspapers, and other resources to create a database of over 10,000 state judges’ biographies. Despite this extensive effort, the finished database is still incomplete. They were unable to find data on the race of about 5% of judges. This database also excludes the nearly 20,000 judges who sit on local and special jurisdiction courts. Furthermore, the database also only reflects the makeup of the bench in 2014; many judges have inevitably retired or been voted out of office in the past four years.


Weekend Reading on Women's Representation August 2, 2018

Posted on Blog on August 02, 2018

Many thanks to RepresentWomen's fabulous summer interns: Katie Pruitt & Evelien Van Gelderen from Swarthmore College, Barbara Turnbull from Oberlin College, Kendrik Icenhour from Duke University, Jamie Solomon from Brown University, Lindsay Richwine from Gettysburg College, Izzy Allum & Sandra Mauro rising seniors at the National Cathedral School, Zoe Roberts a rising senior at Blair High School, and Thomas Mills from Sidwell Friends School. Here is a sample of their terrific work! Barbara Turnbull has been tracking primary contests for our Women to Watch project & finding compelling ways to illustrate international women's representation - see a teaser of her terrific work below:


Join us in turning public passion for gender parity into action and results