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#Women to Watch on September 4th

Posted on Blog by on August 17, 2018

#WomenToWatch on August 11

Posted on Blog by on August 10, 2018

A lot has changed for Beth Fukumoto in the past year. At the start of 2017, Beth Fukumoto was the top-ranking Republican in the Hawaii State House of Representatives. Fukumoto is of Japanese descent and was hailed in several publications as a leader of the changing face of the right. Tomorrow, she is running to become the Democratic nominee in Hawaii’s 1st congressional district. What hasn’t changed, though, is her passion for gender parity in government.


Primary Recap: Tennessee

Posted on Blog by on August 03, 2018

Though hundreds of women are running and winning in 2018’s Congressional primaries, Republican women are strikingly underrepresented: just 17 percent of women nominees so far this cycle are Republicans. Prior to yesterday’s primary, Tennessee was widely considered to be an exception to this “rule”, with several experienced and well-known Republican women running for House, Senate, and Governor. The state has never elected a woman Governor or Senator. Just two women walked away yesterday with Republican nominations, though: current U.S. Representative Marsha Blackburn for Senate and Charlotte Bergmann for House District 9.


Where Is the Data on Judicial Representation?

Posted on Blog by on August 03, 2018

In 2016, Tracey E. George and Albert H. Yoon, in conjunction with the American Constitution Society, published a study titled “The Gavel Gap” that found that 69.8% of state judges were men and 80.4% were white. In order to get this data, George, Yoon, and a team of research assistants spent over a year combing through federal court websites, press releases, newspapers, and other resources to create a database of over 10,000 state judges’ biographies. Despite this extensive effort, the finished database is still incomplete. They were unable to find data on the race of about 5% of judges. This database also excludes the nearly 20,000 judges who sit on local and special jurisdiction courts. Furthermore, the database also only reflects the makeup of the bench in 2014; many judges have inevitably retired or been voted out of office in the past four years.


Weekend Reading on Women's Representation August 2, 2018

Posted on Blog on August 02, 2018

Many thanks to RepresentWomen's fabulous summer interns: Katie Pruitt & Evelien Van Gelderen from Swarthmore College, Barbara Turnbull from Oberlin College, Kendrik Icenhour from Duke University, Jamie Solomon from Brown University, Lindsay Richwine from Gettysburg College, Izzy Allum & Sandra Mauro rising seniors at the National Cathedral School, Zoe Roberts a rising senior at Blair High School, and Thomas Mills from Sidwell Friends School. Here is a sample of their terrific work! Barbara Turnbull has been tracking primary contests for our Women to Watch project & finding compelling ways to illustrate international women's representation - see a teaser of her terrific work below:


Indigenous Women's Representation

Posted on Blog on August 02, 2018

With the 2018 midterm elections quickly approaching, American politics are once again in the spotlight. However, one area of American politics that has long being left in the shadows is the sovereign Native-American governments housed within our country. Native-American tribes, or “nations,” have separate, federally recognized governments, and they have the right to pass their own laws and run their own courts. For decades, the political representation of women and how to increase it has been extensively studied and discussed, but little research has been done on the representation of women in Native-American tribal governments. In an attempt to begin filling in this missing data, RepresentWomen has begun looking into the legislative and judicial branches of thirteen tribal governments.


Weekend Reading on Women's Representation July 27, 2018

Posted on Blog on July 27, 2018

Half of Colombia’s cabinet ministers will be women when the new government takes office next month in a first for the country and a boost for global gender equality. Keeping to his campaign promise, conservative president-elect Ivan Duque, who takes over on August 7, has appointed equal numbers of men and women to his 16-strong cabinet. “It is important that the Colombian woman assumes leadership positions. Colombia will have for the first time a female minister of the interior,” Duque, of the right-wing Democratic Center party, tweeted earlier this month. Women will also head other ministries with political clout, including the ministries of justice and energy, while Marta Lucia Ramirez will be Colombia’s first female vice president.


#WomenToWatch on August 7

Posted on Blog by on July 27, 2018

Primary season resumes in early August, when voters in Tennessee, Michigan, Kansas, Missouri, and Washington will pick their candidates for the 2018 midterm elections. There are dozens of accomplished and passionate women running in these five states’ primaries, and it was difficult to choose just one woman to spotlight this week as part of #WomenToWatch. Brenda Jones, candidate for Congress from Michigan’s 13th district, stands out because of her 13 years of service and leadership on Detroit’s City Council. Currently, Jones is serving her second term as the council’s president.


Introducing the Balanced Bench Project: Examining Representation in the State Judiciary

Posted on Blog by on July 26, 2018

President Donald Trump just nominated Brett Kavanaugh to replace outgoing Associate Justice Anthony Kennedy.  Soon after, CNN ran an article citing a statistic that, if confirmed, Kavanaugh will be the 108th white man to serve on the Supreme Court (he would be only the 114th justice to ever serve). By contrast, the Census Bureau estimates that in 2017, only 30.8% of the U.S. population were white men. Several news outlets shared this statistic to emphasize the vast underrepresentation of people of color and women on the Supreme Court.


Primary Recap: Georgia

Posted on Blog by on July 25, 2018

Georgia voters returned to the polls for a primary runoff election yesterday, following up on three races from the May primary in which no candidate garnered a majority of the vote. Yesterday’s most high-profile contest was a two-man race for Republican gubernatorial nominee. Brian Kemp, Georgia Secretary of State, beat opponent Casey Cagle by nearly 20 points. In November, Kemp will face Democrat Stacey Abrams, a state representative whose candidacy, if successful, would be historic: Abrams would become Georgia’s first Black governor, Georgia’s first woman governor, and the first Black woman governor anywhere, ever.


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