Gender Quotas


Weekend Reading on Women's Representation February 14, 2020

Posted on Blog on February 14, 2020

In recent years we have seen a rise of female representation in governments throughout the world owing in part to certain measures that have been taken allowing for more women in politics. One such measure, albeit a controversial one which to this day stirs quite a debate ranging from it defying the principle of equal opportunity to being outright undemocratic, is the gender-based quota imposed by governments to ensure a substantial female legislative representation. Governments in the MENA region have also taken this issue in stride, a great example of this is seen in the UAE’s Federal National Council (FNC), where the female participation quota has been increased to fifty per cent in an attempt by the government to cement the legislative and parliamentary role of women in the nation's development. Topping this growing list of governments with the greatest gender parity is Rwanda where women make up 61.3% of the lower house


Gender Quotas for the Underrepresented? A Gender Parity Case Study: Brazil

Posted on Blog by on October 28, 2019

To achieve progress in women’s representation in many countries, including Brazil, a change in systems which enable and support the disenfranchisement of women and minorities is needed.



Women's Representation in Chile: Comparative Analysis of Gender Balance Legislation in Chile and Bolivia

Posted on Blog by on July 29, 2019

Chile is the country with the highest GDP per capita and Human Development Index in South America, yet it was one of the last countries to enact a gender quota law in the region. Though higher levels of economic development should be paired with greater gender parity, the reality is that Chile ranks 84th in the world in terms of the percentage of women in Congress, with just 23 percent in the Lower and Upper Houses.



Women's Representation in Costa Rica

Posted on Blog on July 03, 2019

While there are several reasons I believe in efforts to support female candidates, my semester abroad in Costa Rica gave me a new perspective on gender parity pursuits. Studying their electoral system and gender quota laws prompted me to consider what institutional reforms would look like in the United States and strengthened my dedication to advocacy surrounding this topic. 


Weekend Reading on Women's Representation December 14, 2018

Posted on Blog on December 14, 2018

There was a very interesting story from Roll Call that covers Rep Elise Stefanik's focus on supporting republican women in primaries and securing early contributions from PACs to make their races viable: New York Rep. Elise Stefanik recruited more than 100 women as the first female head of recruitment at the National Republican Congressional Committee. But only one of them prevailed, with many failing to make it through their primaries. So Stefanik is stepping back from the NRCC to be involved where she thinks it matters.


RepresentWomen and Nepali Elected Officials Discuss the Future of Women's Political Representation

Posted on Blog by on August 24, 2018

From the hills of the Himalayas to our nation’s capital, the fight for female representation in politics shares many of the same successes and setbacks. Commonalities emerged during a robust and rewarding discussion between RepresentWomen staffers and eight Nepali women leaders. The women, a mix of federal, state and local government officials, visited FairVote’s Takoma Park office on Tuesday as part of an visit coordinated by the U.S. Department of State’s International Visitor Leadership Program and hosted by FHI 360. The meeting also gave participants an opportunity to better understand how their respective country’s electoral and gender parity policies differed.


Weekend Reading on Women's Representation June 1, 2018

Posted on Blog on June 01, 2018

There were several articles this week that caught my eye including this one from Oklahoma Watch about the gender gap that still persists despite the increase in the number of women running: This year, there will be nearly four times as many women running for the same number of seats. And following a trend across the nation, women will be better represented on the ballot than in at least a decade – and likely ever. Female lawmakers say women bring a different perspective and tone to the often-contentious world of lawmaking. But Oklahoma’s gender disparity in the Legislature, which is among the most heavily male dominated in the country, is likely to continue despite movements such as the Oklahoma teacher walkout, the #MeToo movement and liberal opposition to President Donald Trump that have motivated more women across the country to enter politics. An Oklahoma Watch review of legislative candidate filings for the 2018 elections, social media pages and campaign websites shows that women make up 32 percent of this year’s field. That’s a significant increase over the past four election cycles, when female representation among legislative candidates ranged from 15 percent to 22 percent.