Author_Cynthia_Richie_Terrell


Weekend Reading on Women's Representation September 14, 2018

Posted on Blog on September 14, 2018

Just in case you missed this reminder in last week's missive, projected wins for women in House races this fall will likely put the US somewhere in the 70s for women's representation among all nations - in 1998, the US ranked 60th...let's be sure to appreciate and digest the impressive work being done in other countries to elect more women to office - faster.


Weekend Reading on Women's Representation September 7, 2018

Posted on Blog on September 07, 2018

The primaries are nearly over save for remaining contests in New Hampshire (September 11), Rhode Island (September 12), & New York (September 13) according to the National Conference of State Legislatures while "Louisiana’s Nov. 6, 2018, election is an all-comers primary, where candidates of all parties are listed on one ballot together. If no candidate for a race receives a majority of the votes, the winner will be determined in a runoff on December 8." As a reminder, the runoff elections that are triggered in Louisiana & elsewhere, if no candidate wins a majority, are costly and fewer voters participate in them making ranked choice voting a sensible solution.


Weekend Reading on Women's Representation August 31, 2018

Posted on Blog on August 31, 2018

This fall RepresentWomen will become fiscally independent from FairVote and we are planning a celebration! Please buy your ticket for the event & share the invite with others to help us fill the room with women's representation allies! Do let me know if you have any questions or would like to be on the host committee! 6:30 - 8:30pm Thursday, October 11 (Eleanor Roosevelt's birthday) Succotash Restaurant


Weekend Reading on Women's Representation August 24, 2018

Posted on Blog on August 24, 2018

Happy Women's Equality Weekend! In 1971 Representative Bella Abzug (D NY) called for a women's equality day on August 26th of each year to commemorate ratification of the 19th amendment to the US Constitution that granted women the right to vote, according to the National Women's History Project: At the behest of Rep. Bella Abzug (D-NY), in 1971 and passed in 1973, the U.S. Congress designated August 26 as “Women’s Equality Day.” The date was selected to commemorate the 1920 certification of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution, granting women the right to vote. This was the culmination of a massive, peaceful civil rights movement by women that had its formal beginnings in 1848 at the world’s first women’s rights convention, in Seneca Falls, New York.


Weekend Reading on Women's Representation August 2, 2018

Posted on Blog on August 02, 2018

Many thanks to RepresentWomen's fabulous summer interns: Katie Pruitt & Evelien Van Gelderen from Swarthmore College, Barbara Turnbull from Oberlin College, Kendrik Icenhour from Duke University, Jamie Solomon from Brown University, Lindsay Richwine from Gettysburg College, Izzy Allum & Sandra Mauro rising seniors at the National Cathedral School, Zoe Roberts a rising senior at Blair High School, and Thomas Mills from Sidwell Friends School. Here is a sample of their terrific work! Barbara Turnbull has been tracking primary contests for our Women to Watch project & finding compelling ways to illustrate international women's representation - see a teaser of her terrific work below:


Weekend Reading on Women's Representation July 27, 2018

Posted on Blog on July 27, 2018

Half of Colombia’s cabinet ministers will be women when the new government takes office next month in a first for the country and a boost for global gender equality. Keeping to his campaign promise, conservative president-elect Ivan Duque, who takes over on August 7, has appointed equal numbers of men and women to his 16-strong cabinet. “It is important that the Colombian woman assumes leadership positions. Colombia will have for the first time a female minister of the interior,” Duque, of the right-wing Democratic Center party, tweeted earlier this month. Women will also head other ministries with political clout, including the ministries of justice and energy, while Marta Lucia Ramirez will be Colombia’s first female vice president.


Weekend Reading on Women's Representation July 19, 2018

Posted on Blog on July 19, 2018

Every generation has had to wrestle with questions of identity, power and equality - within the family, within religious practice & belief, and within decision making bodies and society at large. Today, however, marks 170 years since the launch of the 'modern' movement for women's rights that brought Quaker, republican, abolitionists and others together to birth a campaign for suffrage and equality. I myself am descended from a long line of Quaker agitators and champions of equality and, lucky for me, I married a man who claims the same heritage. Our generation's call for equality & representation is enriched by those who toiled on those hot summer days in Seneca Falls, NY, 170 years ago.


Weekend Reading on Women's Representation July 13, 2018

Posted on Blog on July 13, 2018

Mexico now ranks 4th for women's representation worldwide! Women in Mexico, of course, are pretty much the same as women in the US but gender quotas and proportional voting are fueling women's electoral success there. RepresentWomen intern Jamie Solomon wrote about women's representation in Mexico last week and political scientists Jennifer Piscopo and Magda Hinojosa wrote an excellent piece for The Washington Post this week: While observers discuss leftist Andrés Manuel López Obrador’s victory in Mexico’s presidential election, complete with majorities in both chambers of congress and control of nearly half the governorships and state legislatures up for election, another historic earthquake has been overlooked: gender parity in congress.


Weekend Reading on Women's Representation July 6, 2018

Posted on Blog on July 06, 2018

The New York Times wrote about women's representation in state legislatures and how those statistics are likely to change after the general elections in November. The piece quotes Katie Ziegler from the NCSL who rightly points out that the central reason that women remain underrepresented is because incumbents win re-election and incumbents are mostly men. While more women are projected to win this November, any that win in seats held by the opposite party are unlikely to hold on to those seats in the next election cycle - which confirms the need for reforms of our district design and voting systems: A record number of women won Nevada’s primaries in June. And there is now a possibility for the Legislature to have more women than men, which would be a first in United States history. Of the states that have had primaries so far, at least eight more have a shot at reaching or surpassing the 50 percent mark in November. To reach this milestone, however, a woman must win the general election in every district where at least one is running, a difficult feat. Some female candidates are running in districts favoring the other party, and many are challenging incumbents, who historically almost always win.


Weekend Reading on Women's Representation June 29, 2018

Posted on Blog on June 29, 2018

Research shows women govern differently than men in ways that change policy and even social attitudes. When more women get into politics, a lot more changes than you might think. Academics have found this over and over again: Women legislators are more likely to introduce legislation that specifically benefits women. They’re better at bringing funding back to their home districts. They get more done. A woman legislator, on average, passed twice as many bills as a male legislator in one recent session of Congress. But the research that stands out most shows that having more women in elected office fundamentally changes the way that society perceives women — and the way that young women think about themselves.


Join us in turning public passion for gender parity into action and results