Author_Katie_Shewfelt


Starting from the Bottom is Why We're Here: Representation in Political Theory

Posted on Blog by on July 21, 2017

Over the past year we’ve been looking at powerful women, and the lack thereof, in executive, legislative, judicial, civil service, and security positions. We want to provide data to help contextualize questions of barriers preventing women from climbing up the public service ladder, and eventually provide a tool for overcoming these barriers - from legislation to grassroots organizing. But these questions got me thinking, not necessarily about the pathways and obstacles that individual women face in their journeys to public leadership, but about the pathway that our society is currently on, and how unchanged that pathway has remained since Athens in the fifth century B.C. It is called “the canon” – specifically, the political theory canon. This canon, and the men that have created it, defined not only western political thinking, but western political structures. These works are considered timeless– which means that not only are their grandiose ideas of liberty and democracy carried into the 21st century, but their bigotry and biases come along too.


Where in the World are the Women Leaders?

Posted on Blog by on July 07, 2017

Taken the morning of July 7, this photo captures a pivotal gathering of the G20 leaders, the key drivers of the international economy. This is, of course, a noteworthy image, but not just because of the striking concentration of global power and authority in a single frame. There is something amiss in this group - and it is revealed in the sea of suits, ties, and balding heads that compose this photograph. This week, German Chancellor Angela Merkel (in red) hosts the members of the G20 summit in Hamburg to discuss international trade, market regulation, and the gravest of global conflicts. Since its crucial role in restoring stability after the 2008 financial crisis, the G20 has served as the linchpin of global economic cooperation. The decisions made during this summit affect nearly every person in the world - yet, only four women are privy to the discussion. Chancellor Merkel and British Prime Minister Theresa May are the only two official participants, while Prime Minister Erna Solberg of Norway and IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde attend as invited guests. None of these women are of color.


Why You Don't Know Who Pauli Murray Is, and Why You Should

Posted on Blog by on July 03, 2017

I have to preface this article with a confession: up until this month, I didn’t know who she was either. The first time I ever heard Pauli Murray’s name spoken, it came from the mouth of Professor Brittney Cooper amidst an impassioned speech on racial politics. As an enthusiastic feminist and a connoisseur of empowered women’s narratives, I was disappointed that I had no idea who Murray was until that moment. But I understood why I didn’t know – and why you probably don’t.


UK Elections Show Impact of Gender Quotas

Posted on Blog by on June 15, 2017

Last week, the U.K. election received mass media attention for its partisan outcome, but less so for its unprecedented election of women to Parliament. On Thursday, June 8th, the U.K. made national history by electing 208 women Members of Parliament - the highest number yet. While the new partisan breakdown sparked heated debate and disagreement, the overwhelming appreciation for this achievement crossed party lines. Many also celebrated the election of the first woman Sikh MP, Preet Kaur Gill, and the first Palestinian MP, Layla Moran.