Author_Evelien_van_Gelderen


#Women to Watch on September 4th

Posted on Blog by on August 17, 2018

#WomenToWatch is a series by RepresentWomen that documents rising women leaders and their stories. Ayanna Pressley’s campaign message is simple: “Change Can't Wait." Pressley, a 44-year old African American woman, was the first black female Boston City Council member. She is running in the Massachusetts Democratic primaries on September 4th to represent the state’s 7th Congressional District. She will be up against incumbent Representative Mike Capuano, who has held the seat for the past 20 years.


Interview with Michelle Whittaker

Posted on Blog by on August 07, 2018

#WomentoWatch on August 7

Posted on Blog by on August 03, 2018


The US Women’s Rights Movement Launched in Seneca Falls, NY

Posted on Blog by on July 19, 2018

The women's’ rights movement in the United States was launched 170 ago at the first American woman’s rights convention, a prominent two-day event at the Wesleyan Chapel in Seneca Falls, N.Y. The convention’s organizers were all Quakers, with the exception of Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Stanton had met another main organizer, Lucretia Mott, at the 1840 World Anti-Slavery Convention, where they were told that women were not allowed to speak or vote and had to sit in a roped-off gallery.


#WomenToWatch on November 6

Posted on Blog by on July 13, 2018

#WomenToWatch is a series by RepresentWomen that documents rising women leaders and their stories. Debra (Deb) Haaland may well become the first Native American congresswoman in United States history come November. This June, she defeated Damon Martinez to win the Democratic primary in the race for New Mexico’s 1st Congressional District. Right now, the district is represented by Michelle Lujan Grisham, who is running for governor and is currently New Mexico’s only woman in Congress.



#WomenToWatch on June 26

Posted on Blog by , , on June 23, 2018

Understanding New Research on Gender and Corruption in Government

Posted on Blog by , , on June 21, 2018

An April 2018 study titled “Women and corruption: What positions must they hold to make a difference?” found that corruption is lower in countries with more women in office at both the national and local level. The authors suggest that this is because women legislators often champion policies that address poverty, education, and healthcare at a greater rate than men, and have been found to be “more concerned about whether subsidies were provided to the targeted group without corruption.”


Women are Underrepresented in the Judiciary

Posted on Blog by on June 20, 2018

While there has been much media coverage on gender disparity in the legislative branch, there is little attention being paid to the lack of representation of women and people of color in the judicial branch. Less than one-third of state judges are women, even while women make up more than one-half of the U.S. population. People of color make up about 40% of the population, but account for less than 20 percent of state judges. At the federal level, only 36 percent of United States trial court judges are women and only 10.5 percent of U.S. federal judges are women of color.


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