Meet the Team: Bobbie

By Bobbie Bell on November 17, 2020

My name is Bobbie Bell, an outreach and advocacy intern for the fall 2020 semester at RepresentWomen.  I am from Brooklyn, New York, aka “the big apple,” where I am pursuing my bachelor’s degree in Journalism and Media Studies at Brooklyn College.  Currently an upper senior, I intend on graduating from Brooklyn College in December of this year.   Over the course of the summer, I had the chance to run a period drive in my own community, collecting numerous donations for women in need during the pandemic.  Although running a period drive virtually due to the coronavirus, I found creative ways to gain support.  

Read more

Meet the Team: Ashley

By RepresentWomen on November 17, 2020

Hi all! My name is Ashley Huang and I’m from San Diego, CA. My pronouns are she/her. Although I’m on a gap year right now, I’m a rising sophomore at Swarthmore College studying Economics and Art History. As a Research Intern, I’m super excited to contribute towards RepresentWomen’s incredible work this fall.

Read more

Meet the Team : Arria

By Arria Alton on November 17, 2020

Hello! My name is Arria Alton and I am a Nonprofit Admin and Development Intern for RepresentWomen. Currently, I am a senior at Vanderbilt University studying Human and Organizational Development with a concentration in Leadership and Organizational Effectiveness. I’m originally from Madison, Wisconsin, where I spent the last six months in quarantine with my family; this resulted in a renewed sense of hometown pride and the return of my Midwestern accent.

Read more

Meet the Team: Andrea

By RepresentWomen on November 17, 2020

My name is Andrea Esquetini and I am a senior at the University of California, Davis, where I am majoring in Communications and minoring in Political Science and Professional Writing. In college, I have spent much of my time writing for local papers and producing videos for campus departments. I love this kind of work, and in the future I hope to continue producing media that has an impact and tells stories that would otherwise go untold. 

Read more

Meet the Team: Alise

By RepresentWomen on November 17, 2020

My name is Alise Blūma, and I am a Communications Intern at RepresentWomen. Born and raised in a small Northern European country called Latvia, in 2018 I packed my life up in two suitcases and began my journey towards a Bachelor's Degree in Advertising and Public Relations at the University of Tampa. 

Read more

Weekend Reading on Women's Representation November 13, 2020

By Cynthia Richie Terrell on November 13, 2020

Gender_Balanced_Appointments_Banner.png

Dear fans of women's representation & leadership.
Results from last week's election are still trickling in so we don't yet know the final tally for the number of women elected to Congress and to state legislative positions. We do know that there were significant wins for women - notably a big increase in the number of Republican women who will serve in the 117th Congress along with gains for women of color in both major parties as well. 
But the results also show that the vast majority of incumbents were re-elected and that while 162 women ran as challengers just 8 have won as of today, for a total win rate of 4%. These incremental gains place the United States at about 70th globally along with neighbors Mali, Slovenia, Kazakhstan, Afghanistan, Vietnam, Bulgaria and Iraq.

Read more

Weekend Reading on Women's Representation November 6, 2020

By Cynthia Richie Terrell on November 06, 2020

Wins_for_women_image_2020.png

Top row (Left to Right): Mauree Turner, Madinah Wilson-Anton, Stephanie Byers, Cori Bush, Christina Henderson
Bottom row (Left to Right): Taylor Small, Marilyn Strickland, Deb Haaland, Sarah McBride
 
Dear allies in the work for women's representation & equality,
Election results are still coming in but we know that record numbers of women won at the local, state, and Congressional level this week. Some highlights include increased numbers of women of color & Republican women who have been elected to Congress, wins for ranked choice voting reform allies at all levels, gender parity on the Washington, DC city council, and wins at the local level for allies like Natalia Macker who won re-election to the Teton County Commission. 

Read more

Meet the Team: Alisha

By Alisha Saxena on November 03, 2020

Hi! My name is Alisha Saxena and I am a senior at the University of California, San Diego, with a major in Political Science-Public Law and a minor in African American Studies. I am currently a Research Intern with the fabulous RepresentWomen team, working remotely from the Bay Area! Though I have been in California for eight years, I spent most of my childhood in Columbia, South Carolina- although its history isn’t great, it is definitely a beautiful place!

Read more

Weekend Reading on Women's Representation October 30, 2020

By Cynthia Richie Terrell on October 30, 2020

EMBARGO_2020_Gender_Parity_Index.jpg

Dear women's representation stalwarts,
On the eve of the 2020 general election, the terrific team at RepresentWomen has compiled an updated Gender Parity Index map that tracks women's representation at the local, state, and federal level - combined - so that we can monitor progress toward parity among states and over time. Find out more about the 2020 Gender Parity Index and look for more information about how your state is doing here. We will be releasing updated numbers after the election but here is a summary of where things stand:

Even if a record number of women win next Tuesday, the U.S. will still fall short of gender parity at the national and state levels and very few states are primed to reach an “A” grade for women’s representation. 

The highlights from our 2020 Gender Parity Index include:

  • New Hampshire reached parity with a score of 50.1. The only state to achieve gender parity, New Hampshire regained its “A” grade after slipping to a “B” in 2019.
  • The majority of states - 60% - received a “D” grade, with 14% receiving a “C”  and 18% receiving a “B.”
  • Three states received an “F” grade in 2020, with Montana slipping from a “D” grade in 2019 and joining Utah and Louisiana.
  • Women’s elected representation varies drastically by region.The west coast continues to outpace most of the country, with six states receiving “B” grades in 2020. 
  • Women’s representation remains uneven between political parties, as does the number of women candidates in 2020. Of the 727 women who filed to run in 2020 in state executive and congressional elections, only 39.5% are Republican (287 of 727). 
Even as the number of women elected continues to increase each election cycle, progress is slow and uneven across race, ideology, age, and geography. Until we address the structural and ingrained barriers women face in politics, the United States is unlikely to make substantial and sustained progress toward gender balance in politics.

Read more

Weekend Reading on Women's Representation October 23, 2020

By Cynthia Richie Terrell on October 23, 2020

50204617941_945463683c_c.jpg

New Zealand election billboard from Flickr
 
Dear women's representation enthusiasts,
We will have to wait a few more weeks to know the winner of the U.S. presidential election but the results are in for prime minister of New Zealand and Jacinda Ardern has won by a significant margin. While the United States and New Zealand both inherited a faulty electoral system from the UK, New Zealand switched to a proportional voting system in 1993 - after a persuasive visit from American proportional representation advocates :) - which led to increased numbers of women elected to parliament including an even younger Jacinda Ardern. John Nichols wrote a terrific piece in The Nation this week about the landslide win for Ardern:

New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern accepted her landslide reelection win Saturday with a message for her country and the rest of the world: “We are living in an increasingly polarized world, a place where more and more people have lost the ability to see one another’s point of view. I hope that this election, New Zealand has shown that this is not who we are. That as a nation, we can listen and we can debate. After all, we are small to lose sight of other people’s perspective. Elections aren’t always great at bringing people together, but they also don’t need to tear one another apart.”

Ardern, the 40-year-old leader of New Zealand’s social democratic Labour Party, did not explicitly mention the highest-profile election of this fall. But it was hard not to recognize in her victory speech a nod to voters in the United States, especially when she said, “This has not been an ordinary election and it’s not an ordinary time. It’s been full of uncertainty and anxiety. And we set out to be an antidote to that.

Read more